Biblical Verses Biblical Verses & Resources

Book of 1 Samuel - Chapter 6 - Verse 7

6:7
Now therefore make a new cart, and take two milch kine, on which there hath come no yoke, and tie the kine to the cart, and bring their calves home from them:

Meaning

In this verse from the book of 1 Samuel in the Bible, we see an interesting instruction given by the prophet Samuel to the people of Israel. The verse talks about making a new cart and taking two milch kine (cows that have recently calved and are giving milk), on which there has been no yoke placed. The significance of using cows that have not been yoked before is symbolic of purity and untouched by human interference. The purpose of tying the cows to the cart and separating them from their calves was to test the power and presence of God. The cows, who were naturally inclined to stay close to their young ones, were led by divine intervention to move away from them and pull the cart as instructed. This miraculous act served as a demonstration of God's will and power to the people of Israel, reinforcing the authority of God and the importance of obedience to His commands.

Theological Overview

One theological interpretation of the verse, 'Now therefore make a new cart, and take two milch kine, on which there hath come no yoke, and tie the kine to the cart, and bring their calves home from them:', can be seen in the symbolism of the new cart and the unyoked cows. In this verse from the book of 1 Samuel, the new cart and unyoked cows were used to transport the Ark of the Covenant back to Israel. This symbolizes the need for purity and consecration in the worship and service of God. The new cart represents a fresh start, free from any contamination or impurity. The unyoked cows, which have not been subjected to the burdens of labor, symbolize the need for dedication and surrender to God's will without any obstacles or distractions. This interpretation emphasizes the importance of approaching God with reverence, humility, and a sincere heart.

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